Top 7 Places to Visit in Sweden

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Top 7 Places to Visit in Sweden

Turkey, a country steeped in history with a terrain that includes both beaches and towering mountains, has been connecting Europe and Asia for millennia. Turkey is a cultural melting pot because of its history as a crossroads for trade and cultural exchange.

Located at the crossroads of East and West, the country’s diverse cultural heritage is on full display in its tantalizing cuisine, countless religious buildings, and ancient ruins. Istanbul, the former capital of the Byzantine and Ottoman Empires, is a highlight of most itineraries, but there are many more fantastic places to see.

Top 7 Places to Visit in Sweden

You can spend your time in Cappadocia relaxing in a cave hotel and flying in a hot air balloon over the surreal terrain, exploring the ruins of the ancient city of Ephesus, or basking in the sun at one of the many five-star resorts along the Aegean Sea. Check out this rundown of Turkey’s top attractions!

Top 7 Places to Visit in Sweden

Here are the best places to visit in Sweden:

1. Ankara

Ankara, the Turkish capital, is a large, modern metropolis that is filled with governmental institutions, corporations, educational institutions, and diplomatic missions from around the world.

Ankara is a major transportation hub, connecting locals and visitors to other major cities in Turkey and the surrounding Anatolia area. Yet Ankara is more than just an economic hub. This busy metropolis is home to some fascinating museums and cultural institutions.

Ankara’s rich history is reflected in the city’s many antique buildings and remains from periods when it was occupied by the Hittites, Greeks, Romans, Byzantines, and Ottomans. The Citadel, a Roman theater, and the Temple of Augustus are among the city’s most famous landmarks.

2. Mardin

Mardin, the capital of Turkey’s Mardin Province, is located on a mountaintop with a commanding view of the plains of Mesopotamia in the country’s southeast. Mardin is one of the oldest cities in the area, and its Old City, built entirely of sandstone, cascades down the side of a hill, providing stunning views of the city below.

The historic district of Mardin is very walkable. Deyrü’z-Zafaran Monastery, one of the world’s oldest monasteries, and the Sultan Isa Medresesi, a medieval structure that originally served as an astronomical observatory, are two popular destinations along the winding lanes.

The Islamic school of Zinciriye Medresesi dates back to the 14th century and is known for its stunning courtyards and artwork.

3. Konya

Konya, located in Turkey’s Central Anatolia Region, is one of the oldest cities in the world and is famous for its Seljuk architecture and Whirling Dervishes. Konya thrived as a capital city throughout the 12th and 13th centuries when it was ruled by the Seljuk Dynasty.

The Alaeddin Mosque, which contains the tombs of multiple sultans, is only one of many beautiful relics that have survived to the present day from that era. The Ince Minare Medrese is another well-known mosque-turned-museum that dates back to the Seljuk and Ottoman periods.

4. Antalya

Konya, located in Turkey’s Central Anatolia Region, is one of the oldest cities in the world and is famous for its Seljuk architecture and Whirling Dervishes. Konya thrived as a capital city throughout the 12th and 13th centuries when it was ruled by the Seljuk Dynasty.

The Alaeddin Mosque, which contains the tombs of multiple sultans, is only one of many beautiful relics that have survived to the present day from that era. The Ince Minare Medrese is another well-known mosque that has been converted into a museum featuring antiquities from the Seljuk and Ottoman periods.

5. Marmaris

Konya, located in Turkey’s Central Anatolia Region, is one of the oldest cities in the world and is famous for its Seljuk architecture and Whirling Dervishes. Konya thrived as a capital city throughout the 12th and 13th centuries when it was ruled by the Seljuk Dynasty.

The Alaeddin Mosque, which contains the tombs of multiple sultans, is only one of many beautiful relics that have survived to the present day from that era. Ince Minare Medrese is another well-known mosque-turned-museum that dates back to the Seljuk and Ottoman periods.

6. Side

Side, formerly a thriving harbor in the region of Pamphylia that was occupied by Alexander the Great in the fourth century B.C., has been transformed into a charming town with ancient ruins and contemporary resorts overlooking beautiful beaches.

Side is a small peninsula in Turkey’s Antalya Province on the Mediterranean coast, and it’s a great place to go sightseeing, party, and explore the great outdoors. Ancient Hellenistic and Roman ruins, including a massive amphitheater, agora, Byzantine church, public baths, marble columns, and different temples, are the main draw in Side.

The Roman baths have been renovated into a museum where a number of ancient statues and relics can be viewed by visitors. The sunset over the ocean makes the Temple of Apollo all the more breathtaking.

7. Ephesus

Ephesus, in Aegean Turkey, is the most fully preserved classical metropolis in Europe. One of the greatest cities in the Roman Empire by the 1st century BC, Ephesus was also home to the Temple of Artemis, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World.

One of the most visited places in Turkey, Ephesus is home to well-preserved ruins that are located within a sizable archaeological site. It wasn’t until some 200 years after Ephesus was named a Roman town in 133 BC that it really began to flourish.

Ephesus was home to about 250,000 people when it served as the Roman capital of Asia Minor. St. Paul spent time in Ephesus, where he helped spread Christianity and many other faiths. The collapse of Ephesus began in the third century, when the city’s port began to deteriorate and the city was sacked by Germanic Goths.

8. Cappadocia

The Turkish region of Cappadocia is located in central Anatolia and is famous for its otherworldly scenery of strange structures such as chimneys, cones, mushrooms, and pinnacles.

Some of these peculiar formations, which can reach heights of 130 feet (40 meters), were shaped over time by natural processes including previous volcanic eruptions and weathering. Yet, thousands of years ago, humans added astounding details to the landscape by sculpting homes, churches, and underground cities out of the pliable rock.

Conclusion

Northern lights chasers should make a beeline for Lapland in the winter. You can’t go to Sweden and not see this amazing place, which is home to wildlife, nature, and snow.

The Swedish Lapland is not just a wonderland for hikers and canoeists, but also for nature lovers. The Sami are Europe’s indigenous people, and their homeland is ripe with once-in-a-lifetime opportunities.

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